In less than a week, the number of cyclospora cases linked to McDonald’s salads rose just over 100, from 61 to 163, CDC said. As a precautionary measure, McDonald’s has stopped selling the affected salads in about 3,000 fast food restaurants in 14 states in an attempt to contain the outbreak, FDA said.

The states are Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio, Minnesota, Nebraska, South Dakota, Montana, North Dakota, Kentucky, West Virginia and Missouri.

FDA is working with McDonald’s and local health authorities to identify the salad ingredients making people sick and to trace them through the supply chain.

cyclospora cayetanensis, the bacterium that causes the infection, causes symptoms which can begin up to a week or more after consuming the parasite, which makes pinpointing the source of the illness problematic. When they do present, signs and symptoms of cyclosporiasis include diarrhea and frequent, sometimes explosive bowel movements, according to the CDC. Other symptoms include loss of appetite, weight loss, stomach cramps or pain, nausea, gas and fatigue. Vomiting, headache, fever, body aches and flu-like symptoms can also occur.

Cyclosporiasis can last from a few days to a few months and patients might feel better, then get worse again. Treatment typically includes a combination of antibiotics.

Source: CNN

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Ray Simon

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Ray Simon is a veteran copywriter with more than a decade's worth of experience in the field. He studied journalism at Vanderbilt University, graduating Cum Lade in 2007. Ray currently specializes in writing content and news articles for independent publications.

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